Contextualization

Being a Missionary Learner

Missionary LearnerExciting stories of indigenous people repenting, believing in Jesus, being baptized, gathering together as a church and going out and planting other indigenous churches… that is what all missionaries want to write home about from day one upon reaching the field. Is that realistic? Well, with God all things are possible but in the event that He decides not to work that way let me share something that I hope will get you thinking as it has me.

Four months into our time being in South Texas at the Center for Pioneer Church Planting, one thing struck me: the ENORMITY of the task of taking the gospel to unreached people. Yes, we can all think of some of the physical difficulties and absence of creature comforts ahead for us which are mind blowing in themselves. But think about this – missionaries to unreached people groups often have to be at least tri-lingual (English, trade language, tribal heart-language). Many times the tribal heart-language may not even be written. More

The Value of Contextualization

This week, we have been honored to have David Sills come and teach our missionary trainees, as he does each year, on the topic of “Culture and Contextualization” at the Center for Pioneer Church Planting (CPCP). Sills has been a longtime favorite of ours to have in the classroom because of the gifts God has given him in this area of life and ministry. Often, if we are not careful and aware in our biblical studies, it is easy to not step out of our comfort zone to communicate the gospel in cultures unlike our own. Crossing cultures to bring the gospel to unreached people groups is an incredible challenge. And it is for this reason that we appreciate Dr. Sill’s fresh and eye opening perspective to the CPCP. More

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